Dobson Disses Thompson

September 20, 2007 by susan
James Dobson, holding bible

Who's it gonna be for the quaking defenders of marriage now? It just keeps getting better. However, even with the Repugs all singing out of tune, I still think it's well within the reach of the Dems to snatch presidential defeat from the maw of victory one more time. They just seem to have a knack for it, and practice makes perfect. Slouching toward November, 2008. 487 days.

Below are snips from an AP story on Dobson's displeasure with Thompson from the
Rocky Mountain Times.
(Hat tip, HD) Read snips.
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Ed Gorski, AP September 19, 2007
DENVER — James Dobson, one of the nation’s most politically influential evangelical Christians, made it clear in a message to
friends this week he will not support Republican presidential hopeful Fred Thompson.

In a private e-mail obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press, Dobson accuses the former Tennessee senator and actor of being weak on the campaign trail and wrong on issues dear to social conservatives.

"Isn’t Thompson the candidate who is opposed to a Constitutional amendment to protect marriage, believes there should
be 50 different definitions of marriage in the U.S., favors McCain-Feingold, won’t talk at all about what he believes, and
can’t speak his way out of a paper bag on the campaign trail?" Dobson wrote.

"He has no passion, no zeal, and no apparent ’want to.’ And yet he is apparently the Great Hope that burns in the breasts of many conservative Christians? Well, not for me, my brothers. Not for me!" (emphasis added)

The founder and chairman of Colorado Springs-based Focus on the Family, Dobson draws a radio audience in the millions, many of whom first came to trust the child psychologist for his conservative Christian advice on child-rearing..

Dobson’s strong words about Thompson underscore the frustration and lack of unity among Christian conservatives about the GOP field. Some Christian right leaders have pinned their hopes on Thompson, describing him as a Southern-fried Ronald Reagan. But others have voiced doubts in recent weeks about some of the same issues Dobson highlighted: his position on gay marriage and support for the 2002 McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform legislation.

Dobson and other Christian conservatives support an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would bar gay marriage nationally.

Thompson has said he would support a constitutional amendment that would prohibit states from imposing their gay marriage laws on other states, which falls well short of that.
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There's more. If you care. I zapped a bunch.

Dobson has now dissed Thompson, McCain and Guilliani for . . . their stances on Iraq? Terrorism? Nope, folks, we've got bigger battles to fight. Gay people want the right to get married like everyone else. It's a heart pounder. The nation is at peril. Onward Huckabee! Brownback! Dasher and Dancer!

BTW, also in the AP article:
Last week, Dobson announced on his radio show that the IRS had cleared him of accusations that he had endangered his
organization’s nonprofit status by endorsing Republican candidates in 2004. The IRS said Dobson, who endorsed President Bush’s re-election bid, was acting as an individual and not on behalf of the nonprofit group.

Yabba dab-solutely.

Posted in

Comments

Poet (not verified) | September 21, 2007 - 8:31am

I don't know whether tihs made your cutting room floor but I also heard a story that "Frid" also professed himself a Christian who had no use for organized religion and tried to stay away from church services as much as possible.

Pity Dobson and the rest of the christo-fascists becasue for the past nearly 7 years they have had a blank slate of a President on whose mind they could write just about anything they wanted without fear of contradiction (as long as Mr. Cheney gave ihis boy the okay!).

Now it's starting to dawn on this bunch that their pink cloud of euphoria is due for a rude awakening. No more D. James Kennedy, no more Jerry Falwell, and James Dobson, Pat Robertson, and the rest of thier ilk are looking more and more like old and irrelevent farts who belong in the past and not in the future.

It's almost enough to take seriously the astrological notion that all it takes for certain planets to realign with certain stars before change occurs whether logic, necessity, or passion would dictate otherwise or not.

It would be the saddest of all ironies if what will follows isn't any better than what preceded it but just bumblingly different in its incompetence.

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barbara aka babs (not verified) | September 21, 2007 - 9:24am

It would be the saddest of all ironies if what will follows isn't any better than what preceded it but just bumblingly different in its incompetence.

oh, lordy (sorry, sorry, sorry -- blasphemy!), that's what I fear most deeply. Because if what's out there vying for the presidency is the best America has to offer, we are so screwed (sorry, sorry, sorry -- sex!).

That said, Dobson got a bit of it right in his high-handed, arrogant, self-righteous (sorry, sorry, sorry -- judgmental!) way, to wit:

"He (Thompson) has no passion, no zeal, and no apparent ’want to.’ And yet he is apparently the Great Hope that burns in the breasts of many conservative Christians? Well, not for me, my brothers. Not for me!"

All right. Everyone on your knees (sorry, sorry, sorry -- sex again!). No, assume the penitent position, for the mighty James has spoken (sorry, sorry, sorry -- idolatry!).

How the hell (that's okay -- it's biblical) did faux religion get so woven into the fabric (I am SO sick of that metaphor) of American politics. It's all a big, fat charade. And you're right, Poet, I think the idiots have strutted their hour upon the stage on the way to irrelevance.

Okay, I said it but not sure I believe it. Because I am absolutely flabbergasted (I really, really, really wanted to say gobsmacked, but the mind police didn't like it the last time I did) at how many people I know (or thought I did) who've been sucked into all of this.

I'm babbling. That is the way of things when faced with the pulse-pounding excitement of waiting for Dobson's choice.

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Poet (not verified) | September 21, 2007 - 10:15pm

Barbara wonders:

How the hell (that's okay -- it's biblical) did faux religion get so woven into the fabric (I am SO sick of that metaphor) of American politics.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

It can be traced back to the days of the Massachuttsetts Bay Colony and the popularization of the metaphor "The City on the Hill" by both John Cotton (leading Puritan preacher) and John Winthrop (God's divinely appointed governor) to describe their settlement in the New World..

An excellent interview discussing American Exceptionalism from the colonial period to the present days can be found at:

http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2007/09/17/3896/

It is an interview by Tom Englehardt (tomsiapatch.com) of Boston Globe columnist James Carroll-- who like Chris Hedges-- has been trained as a theologian as well as a writer.

The executive summary is this:

The Puritans were a bunch of religious zealots who came to the New World so that they could worship God in the way that their conscience dictated and make good and sure that everyone else did the same.

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paul miller (not verified) | September 22, 2007 - 8:43am

You have to wonder about a country that waits with bated breath for a guy like Fred "Garvin" Thompson to jump in to add sex appeal to the race. (don't believe your eyes and ears but believe what we are telling you)

The corporate media decides who is legit - the tea leaves suggest they are plenty satisfied with Bushit as he continues to get whatever the hell he wants with an approval rating in the 20s. Obviously they couldn't care less what we think.

Dobson thinks he's a player when actually he's been played just like the rest of us. At this point if we are looking to either of the political parties to be on the side of the greater good we are seriously deluded.

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