This (un)Holy Season

April 06, 2007 by susan
Water Vapor Globe

by susan
Good Friday. If you're of that persuasion. Even though the sun's shining, it's record-setting cold here in Minnesota, with wind chills in single digits. April has earned its cruelest month status.

Today, after six years (and haggling on wording right to the finish line) the UN's Intergovermental Panel on Climate Change, made up of 2500 international scientists, released its report on global warming. Even though most of us have known this for at least a decade, and Al Gore won an Oscar for putting it on the big screen, the heart sinks to see it all spelled out.

And even though being right is little comfort in the face of this calamity, I can't resist: Eat your heart out Michael Crichton and Senator "global warming is the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" Inhofe. And to the right-wing dopes, who are already pointing to our cold snap as a real thigh-slapper of a day to release a report on global warming, don't confuse weather with climate.

The report paints a "near-apocalyptic vision" of Earth's future: more than 1 billion people in desperate need of water, extreme food shortages in Africa, a blighted landscape ravaged by fires and floods and millions of species sentenced to extinction.

And because the lord works in mysterious ways, the most desperately poor countries, those which contributed least to the problem, will suffer the most. For the Malthusians among us, yes, millions in far away places will die, but millions more will migrate, crowding into places where resources are already strained, places where they are unwelcome, and the repercussions will be world-wide. Even if you have no heart, these things will feast on your grandchildren's hearts.

Well, as they say with all junkies, you gotta admit you have a problem before you can change.

And what better time than during Passover, when God freed the
Jews from slavery by unleashing ten terrible plagues on the Egyptian people, or, on the flip side of that coin, during Easter, on the day when Jesus was crucified before rising from the dead?

Back in the day when I went to a church, the iconoclastic priest gave an Easter sermon about the resurrection. They all do. But he spoke of resurrection in non-religious terms -- the disabled child who learns to read, the stroke victim who regains speech, the closeted gay who comes out, the Irish mothers who made peace out of rage.

I am of little faith, but to get up each day, to present a hopeful face to my children and grandchildren, I have to believe in that sort of a resurrection. A resurrection of national humility and will to do right, and, in George Bush's America, a resurrection of science over religion. Maybe then we can still manage to save the world god gave us.

Posted in

Comments

ERDEN DUYGU (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 6:08am

Amin! (Amen!)

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Babs (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 7:45am

What an interesting take on resurrection. Recovery and renewal vs. born-again. No! Not versus. Way too much of that. That said, the Bush administration must be a great blessing, having given us so many opportunities for recovery morally, militarily, socially, environmentally. Our modern-times plague is likely to be far more deadly than the Black Plague of the fourteenth century, as Susan noted above. This time around, a funeral pyre that defies comprehension. Trees, bodies, values, the Constitution. Decency, justice, honesty, pffffft! The last thing to go will be hope. And so a Tinkerbell moment for us -- ironic imagery, if you run with it. Clap your hands if you believe. Then make phone calls, write letters to the editor, to Congress, heck, even to GWB. Participate in vigils. Talk to your neighbors, friends, family. Passover and resurrection require our active participation.

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Poet (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 7:48am

Hi Susan--

One thing that has helped me to endure the studied stupidity of the past (especially the past 6 years) is the idea of the redemptive power of suffering. This means that the calamities we face have the power to be redeemed for the greater good of all when we seek to do so.

This is also the power of the death and resurrection, the suffering and deliverance from enslavement in Egypt, and other stories of redemption from which we can draw courage. This is not just what "they" are about--it is also what "we" are about.

Shalom
Salem
Pax

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susan | April 7, 2007 - 10:29am

Thanks y'all, interesting responses. What bothers me about the suffering model is that the suffering is so unequally doled out.
The article about Zambia today (NYTimes) and how big Agra holds congress by the shorthairs and insists on relief food being grown only in the US and shipped overseas vs. buying the local corn in Zambia (and it's much more complicated than that) put that suffering right in my face. And right here at home we see the suffering of the Iraq war born by a teeny percentage of Americans.
And the UN report on global warming says it too -- the poor will suffer far more than the wealthy, even in developed (and morally undeveloped) countries.
There was a small article in the Strib about how Minnesota might actually benefit from a warmer planet with a longer growing season. Give me a break! We'll have scorcher summers with two more weeks to grow the crops to ship to the starving hordes all over the world (providing the missing bees miraculously reappear) and we'll feel good about that?
But I do agree with you Poet, I have to, that this calamity now seems to be uniting the world, and that we have enough knowledge to at least modify our life-snuffing carbon footprint by taking a huge leap into technology, a technology as foreign to us as a light bulb would have been to a caveman.
There's been a tendency of environmentalists, me included, to look nostalgically at past practices, and urge a return to slower greener times. But as my two cars, and Al Gore's house, make clear, we ain't gonna go that route for real. Yes, those of us who can afford to will attempt to eat locally grown foods, but anything called "artesan" isn't going to have a big impact on world habits. As much as I loathe Wal-Mart, their conversion to greener practices just might.
Onward. Here's to rebirth, new life, miracles.

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perhansa (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 12:22pm

There have been studies (sited by Sam Harris & MIchael Shermer) that looked at the correlation between belief in god and the quality of life in various developed countries. Interstingly enough, the countries that are consistently rated as the best place to live based on things like life expectancy, level of education, per capita income, violent crime, infant mortality rates, access to healthcare, etc. (e.g., Norway, Sweden, Netherlands) have the lowest rate of belief in god. Many have drawn the conclusion that there is likely a strong connection between relinquishing a belief in the next life where suffering and anquish will be redeemed and a willingness to put resources into making this life better for as many as possible. Perhaps there is no redemption nor meaning to suffering, only eradication.

David Sloan Wilson in his new book just released, Evolution for Everyone, tells an interesting story about chicken research that gives him hope for humankind in evolution. A chicken researcher decided to isolate the top producing chickens from each hen house (and house them together) and see what would happen over the course of six generations. In parallel, he also isolated the chickens in the henhouse that collectively were the most productive and watched them for six generations. What he discovered is that the "superstar chickens" achieved their productivity by suppressing and terrorizing the other chickens. After six generations only three were still alive and they were wounded and featherless from continual assault. The chickens in the "cooperative" henhouse were alive, healthy, "happy" and even more productive after six generations. It seems that evolution may select for cooperation within groups and an element of altruism after all. (Perhaps that's why New York and Boston consistently fail to meet expectations while harboring numerous superstar chickens while the Twins, who pay attention to the right mix of people and the "spirit" of the henhouse seem to consistently exceed expectations!).

Of course, cooperation within the group doesn't necessarily extend to cooperation outside the group. That requires extending the boundries of what is considered "the group". At least, that offers me some hope for humanity on this not so spring like day.

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perhansa (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 10:24am

I thought E. J. Dionne’s criticism of the evangelical zeal of the neo-atheists in todays Strib was ill-timed given the IPCC report, part 2. The volatility and interconnectedness of our world demand a public hearing on religion and its effect on human behavior. The neo-atheist ire is largely directed at the faith-based religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Extremists within all three of these monotheistic religions threaten our survival, and passivity by moderates (as Poet and Chris Hedges point out--thank you) allow intolerance and superstition to be spread like manure. Worse yet, it allows too many Americans to turn to the Rapture Index instead of the IPCC report and see the coming plagues and disasters as a fulfillment of the "revelations" of the tribal god of the Big Three.

Religious belief, in some form, goes back to the beginnings of history with the seven gods of the Sumerian culture, and further back into pre-history, as evidenced by elaborate burial rituals and the endurance of animism. To survive that long, and consume as much energy as it does, belief is likely an evolutionary adaptation. The brain is hardwired by natural selection to look for causal connections, patterns, and meaning, which is likely the root of belief. Ethical behavior is also evolutionary, not a by-product of religion. The question needs to be raised whether the next phase of human evolution will be guided by superstition or rationalism. Can we afford the luxury of tolerating anti-scientific, anti-rationalist, faith-and-fear-based religion, especially at its extremes?

American’s unwillingness to accept the reality of evolution by natural selection puts us on a footing with the lowest tier countries in this area of scientific literacy. Our unwillingness to admit to and aggressively address global climate change through strict policy puts us on a footing with, well, I'm not sure there is comparable comparison. I have friends who live in Switzerland who continually ask, What is wrong with Americans? Who do you think you are that you can let the rest of the world deal with global climate change and turn your back and say, "Not us"? Given the daunting challenges we face can we afford to continue believing in the tribal gods of ancient religions? I don't believe in gods because I don't believe in Mother Goose. Rationalism, cooperation, science and reason seem to be our best hope.

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Poet (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 6:12pm

I draw the line between an individual's faith (for which I can have great respect--even though I might not be in accord with it) and organized religion of all stripes which give rise to intermediary heirarchial orders between an individual's conscientious faith and the God to which that faith is expressed.

True Jews are too concerned with trying to be worthy of the appelation of being "God's people" to be busy trying to figure out how to do Messiah's work for him.

True Christians are too busy trying to bring their own corrupt nature into subnmission to the doctrine of Jesus Christ to have any time or energy to force others to do so.

True Muslims revere both Abraham (the "father" of both the Jews and Muslims) and Jesus (the Savior of Christians) as both their ancestor (in Abraham's case) and the one who preceeded Mohammed (in Christ's case) to have any interest in the slaughter of "infidels" in the name of their prophet and Allah.

But, give the "faithful" some human heirarchial leadership seeking to justify the importance of theri own existence and presto-chango there is hatred and competition "in God's (Allah's) name". This is not just the fault of manipulative heirarchies it is also the fault of complicit "sheeple" who leave their brain at the church door (like they leave their faith at the workplace or house door.)

Perhansa's "faith" in evolution reminds me of creationist's faith in their pet theories of just exactly how God did his creation (like in just 6000 years and so many other fantastical fairy tales promoted by militant evangelical zealots.)

To get a look at the absurdity of the most basic premise of evolution, take out your cell phone (or wrist watch if you are not connected to the cell phone culture). Then as you gaze at it look yourself in the miorror and say:

"Untold eons ago forces (where did they come from?) acted on matter (Where did it come from?) and slowly and gradually over many millions (perhaps billions!) of years through many intermediary steps (too numerous to count!) this cell phone (wrist watch) evolved into what we know today!"

Do you believe yet? 8o)) Well just give it some more time and keep repeating it and soon it will make more sense!

Each and every cell of your body (or any other life form's) has within it the double helix of its genetic matter that is a zillion times more complex than anything mankind has designed and built (look how many years with the aid of super computers and multiple teams of scientists working on individual sections of the genome that it took to just map the thing let alone understand what the map was telling them--which is job next for the same scientists).

If a cell phone's or wristwatch's complexity demands an intelligence greater than itself for the design to come into existence how much more for the vast interconnected and balanced web of life that makes up earthly existence?

In other words the design of life (of which we have abundant evidence) demands a designer of greater power and intelligence than that which is designed. That power, intelligence, and designer would be called God.

I don't expect any of my analogy above to change your own or any other mind if you be of the militant evolutionary and skeptical persuasion. In fact I would not want any mind to change on this or anything else except as the result of an inner conviction that it do so.

The giggle that the evolution vs. creation controversy gives me is just how similar are the motivations of the more militant members of both camps. Each is so busy minding other people's business that they don't find time to take care of their own.

This to me is tjhe biggest difference between personal faith and organized relilgion (or philosophy).

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perhansa (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 8:10pm

Wow! That's a whole other subject to tackle, but what a great discussion today.

It sounds like perhaps you believe in Spinoza's God like Einstein did. As an evolutionist I often wonder, as Carl Sagan did, why people don't look at the world as science depicts it and say, "Wow, this is even more amazing then we imagined and more wonderful than our holy books described." The photos coming back from Saturn and Mars are more stunning and awe-inspiring to me than any description I've ever read of heaven or utopia! But I hear you expressing that attitude in what you wrote, Poet! I admire that you admire the "creation".

I often wonder, if horses had symbolic language and could create gods--do you think god would be a horse? What about if birds could create gods? For me the greatest argument against theism, is that it isn't theism, but theisms. And they're all anthropomorphic theisms. And they're all geocentric theisms. How do we know God isn't an extraterrestrial? Having studied (and practiced) some of the worlds religions (there are over 100,000 different religions in the world today), I surmised that they can't all be right, but they could all be wrong.

I learned from D. S. Wilson's fascinating book (which I've had my nose stuck in much of the day today) that we share the same gene for regulating appetite as a nematode. Nematodes have been around for millions of year. Just one of a mountain of evidence for common descent (something that DOES distinguish evolution from creationism). I don't argue that evolution rules out the possiblility of god, if there is one, IT (or ET) likely created the "Creation" using the natural laws we see today (or IT's a Great Deceiver). As a former born-again christian and zen buddhist my spiritual journey culminated in non-theism the more I understood evolution and the incompatability of theisms. I appreciate your opinion and respectfully honor your spiritual journey and whatever conclusions you've come to for yourself. We certainly won't change each others minds. Perhaps we can find common ground in our mutual admiration for the "creation" and desire to see it unharmed by one species at the expense of many others.

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Poet (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 10:02pm

Perhensa wrote:
It sounds like perhaps you believe in Spinoza's God like Einstein did. As an evolutionist I often wonder, as Carl Sagan did, why people don't look at the world as science depicts it and say, "Wow, this is even more amazing then we imagined and more wonderful than our holy books described."

******************

Putting scriptures (no matter whose) in competitiion with science makes about as much sense as using Darwinian evolution to justify the uebermensch (or superman) theories of Nietsche and others so avidly adopted by the eugenic and Nazi master race crowd to justify the strong persecuting to the point of extermination the weak (called also "Social Darwinism")

Scripture is intended as a moral guide and not a scientific, historical, or legal reference though you wouldn't know it from the way religious heirarchies abuse the texts. (Mostly I suspect for the purpose of acquiring and maintaining power over others!) Evolution likewise is not intended as a moral guide but rather as a way to explain similarities amongst diverse species. Given the choice between believing heirachial fairy tales and the limited evidence he could see before his eyes Darwin (like Galileo before him!) chose to believe what he could physically see.

My understanding is that Einstein (perhaps like Spinoza) and Thomas Jefferson were Dieists which as I understand it means they picture "god" as an impersonal force which wound things up and let them go as they please--keeping hands off while entropy disolves everything and everyone.

If that is correct, then I am not in their camp because I do believe that God is a distinct personality who is involved in the creation Her/She made.

Prove it, the rational skeptic reasonably challenges and my answer is I cannot do so because it is a matter of faith and not verifiable fact. Rational skeptic understandably feels that his/her argument is superior and that I am believing in fables.

But rational skeptic doesn't realize that his/her explanation is also incomplete becasue: neither of us were present at creation to understand exactly what really did happen nor do any of us have a rational explanation for existence that accounts for all the knowledge we can know even in this incomplete state of enlightenment.
Perhensa also wrote:

I learned from D. S. Wilson's fascinating book (which I've had my nose stuck in much of the day today) that we share the same gene for regulating appetite as a nematode. Nematodes have been around for millions of year. Just one of a mountain of evidence for common descent (something that DOES distinguish evolution from creationism) I don't argue that evolution rules out the possiblility of god, if there is one, IT (or ET) likely created the "Creation" using the natural laws we see today (or IT's a Great Deceiver). As a former born-again christian and zen buddhist my spiritual journey culminated in non-theism the more I understood evolution and the incompatability of theisms.

Our rational human experience tells us:

Design demands a designer.

Law demands both a law giver and law enforcer.

Ecology demands that everything we know (from flowers and bees to plankton, krill, and whales had to simultaneously appear exactly as they are else the web of life would have been broken and we could not exist as we do.

I also agree that it is a mark of enjoyable discussion to disagree without being disagreeable which certainly characterizes your posts and (I hope) my own.

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susan | April 7, 2007 - 10:35pm

You're both enjoyable to read -- well informed and thoughtful. You add some heavy linen to the clothesline, a nice change of pace. Thanks for being so -- agreeably disagreeable.

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Poet (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 11:00pm

Your welcome! Thanks for providing enough line for me to hang myself out to dry! I have loved this site with yourself, Barbara, and Lynell ever since i read some of all your writings in Common Dreams.

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perhansa (not verified) | April 7, 2007 - 11:40pm

Poet:
Your posts are quite enjoyable to read and you disagree quite agree-ably. Thanks. Kudos to the Clothesline for the openness and for a strong rope for airing laundry!

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susan | April 7, 2007 - 11:53pm

Well, we like to feel the fresh air in our -- bloomers. Better than a tumble dryer.
Do you know that the name was a spoof on the Powerlineblog.com? It's the one written by three Mpls. lawyers who take credit for 'bringing down' Dan Rather over the flap about Bush's military evasion, er, service. Thus, "No power, but our linen's clean."
And now, to bed. And thanks, really, for a very interesting day on the Line.

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Poet (not verified) | April 8, 2007 - 6:39am

Susan you are too funny! 8o)))

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gtnbfghn (not verified) | June 4, 2007 - 2:16pm

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regdbcvb (not verified) | June 6, 2007 - 6:46am

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rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt
rington.txt fraze.txt

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